In this issue:

         Medical News  •  Patient Resources  •  Did You Know?  •  Practice Management Tips


Medical News

New study sheds light on painkilling system in brain
Repeatedly boosting brain levels of one natural painkiller soon shuts down the brain cell receptors that respond to it, so that the painkilling effect is lost, according to a surprising new study led by Scripps Research Institute and Virginia Commonwealth University scientists. The study has important implications for drug development.
Source: Lab Spaces

Canada's supply of doctors rises to new high: about 68,100 working doctors
The Canadian Institute for Health Information says about 68,100 doctors were working last year - almost 2,700 more than the year before. It's an upward trend that was years in the making as medical schools enrolled more students, and it bodes well for the future of any Canadians who have had difficulty finding a family doctor in recent years.
Source: Sympatico.ca

Canada Announces Co-Chairs of Canadian HIV Vaccine Initiative Advisory Board
Health Minister Leona Aglukkaq marked the World AIDS Day by announcing that Dr. Bhagirath Singh and Dr. Jose Esparza will Co-Chair the Advisory Board that will oversee the renewed Canadian HIV Vaccine Initiative (CHVI) and its Research and Development Alliance.
Source: Public Health Agency of Canada

Patient Resources

Understanding Cholesterol Numbers
Cholesterol levels should be measured at least once every five years by everyone over the age of 20. The screening test that is usually performed is a blood test called a lipoprotein profile. Experts recommend that men aged 35 and older and women age 45 and older be routinely screened for lipid disorders.
Source: WebMD

Gifted Kids, Harsh Truths
Pablo Picasso was a child prodigy. But so was William James Sidis, a math whiz who graduated from Harvard at age 15 - and grew to despise math so much that he worked mindless clerical jobs until his death.
Source: Psychology Today

Did You Know?

How do You Answer Those Awkward Questions Your Kids Ask?

Do your kids ask a lot of questions about how the body works, staying safe or unexpected issues you were not quite prepared for yet? Here is a website that will make answering much simpler: KidsHealth. Filled with videos, articles, and audio material about anything from the growing body and mind, bullying, drugs and alcohol, to cooking healthy and recipes for kids, enjoy this informative websites for parents and kids alike, over the winter holidays.

 

Practice Management Tips

Improve Patient Interaction to Ensure Greater Compliance with Recommendations

Taking the time to provide your patients with information about their health improves interaction and contributes to acceptance of treatments. Nowadays, patients want to understand why recommendations are made and how they fit in with overall well being. Healthcare providers can arm themselves with excerpts from the patient’s personal medical history to ensure that advice is perceived as a requirement rather than a recommendation.

Tracking conditions, lab results, and even notes about concerns the patient reported over a long period of time can be used to reiterate conclusions in an manner that is easily understood. This can often be a persuasive tool. For example, when used to demonstrate a condition is deteriorating, or lingering for an extensive amount of time. A well-documented health record inspires trust and affects credibility. Patients feel that they were being listed to and the physician is providing good value that is relevant to their particular case. This confidence is more likely to lead to greater compliance.

If you are using an EHR application, previously logged medical history and prescriptions are already accessible in a sensible way. You can use timelines and graphs from your EHR as a platform for discussions with your patient about your objectives and recommendations.

  

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